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Your cravings and your health

Are you moderating your food cravings with prudence? Or have you taken an "all or nothing" approach? If the latter, you may be in for some negative, and waist-expanding surprises tells us nutritionist Nancy Clark. Remember that cravings are not addictions. If you crave a certain food, your body may have good reasons for wanting it. Controlling the quantity you consume is a totally different question.

 

 


How do you stay fit?

No one has asked me this question (yet) but this is the one that always comes up when Jennifer Aniston appears on a talk show.

Her answer is simple and straightforward:

1. I work out (every day) doing cardio consistently, preferably a program that includes intervals. I also do weight training, yoga and pilates regularly throughout the week.

2. I eat well. This means eating a balanced diet of vegetables and lean protein with a few complex carbohydrates throughout the day. I don't drink, other than socially. I avoid fatty meats and dairy even though I will indulge once in a while and truly enjoy my food.

3. I sleep at least eight hours at night. Sleep is very important for me.

Yes! This is exactly how Jennifer Aniston defines her fitness routine and the proof is in this video.

Is Jennifer's list too hard to implement all at once? Begin with one of the items on her list and make progress slowly and steadily.

 

(Post by Thomai Serdari)

Justin Bieber as an Inspiration

Considering that I am trying to convince young people to become more active, I think this video is appropriate. Is it silly? Totally! But we cannot always be serious in life. Everyone in this short 2:43 minutes deserves applause. Have fun!

 



 

 

(Post by Thomai Serdari)

 

 


Resolutions and challenges

 

Here is a suggestion for parents, guardians, mentors, big sisters and brothers, aunts and uncles.

 

January is a time of resolutions.  These usually revolve around us: 1. This year I will have more fun; 2. I will lose weight; 3. I will learn a new language; and the list goes on. Enthusiasm builds up at the beginning of the month, reaches its peak by the third week, and sadly dwindles down from then and on. 

 

Most of our resolutions require effort on our part. They also require some type of method, or if you prefer a strategy, but generally speaking, a method of marking milestones of progress and accomplishments. According to advice found in popular magazines, it is better to set goals along with a friend so that both get constant support and motivation.

 

I would like to challenge this because it is usually assumed that your “gym buddy” is your contemporary (best friend, husband, girlfriend). I propose this instead: Choose one of your children, advisees, students, niece and nephews, anyone between the ages of 12 and 18, especially those who would benefit from physical exercise.

 

Agree to support each other and make a pact.  Articulate and define your resolutions. But each one’s resolution must be different. For example, you cannot both want to have more fun, or want to learn a new language. Since you will be motivating them to work out more, you should perhaps tackle another task, such as keeping organized tax records or fix the garage, anything other than losing weight.

 

Why is this important? Children are very observant and tend to be critical, particularly with those for whom they care. They will really be on your case if you promise to be organized. According to your agreement, they should be open to receiving direction and guidance from you on how to be more physically active and how to make healthier food choices. You need to come up with creative ways to motivate them and communicate with them the fun aspects of exercise. You are also their role model so perhaps you should mind your food choices as well.

 

I predict the following: You will both lose weight plus you (the parent/guardian/mentor) will get an additional project done. I truly challenge you to try this. I would also love to receive your thoughts and comments or your suggestions on how to make this idea even more feasible. I would love to hear from those who are parents or those who are close to children. Give it some thought. The irony is that even though you may resist, the young ones are always up for a challenge!

 

(Post by Thomai Serdari. Email us at: workoutworkup@yahoo.com)